A camping trip to beat them all

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Karen Sutherland’s timing is impeccable _ her one night on Antarctica coincided with last month’s “supermoon”.
When the Duntroon woman booked her sea voyage to the frozen continent, she grabbed one of only 60 camping spots available on the mainland.
“There was no way I was not going to do this. The agony of regret watching the campers Zodiacing to land that evening without me would have been more painful than my flesh starting to freeze.”
The landing party was given sleeping bags covered with nylon, wind-proof, water-resistant bivouacs.
“After arriving on the purest pristine campsite ever, it was find a spot and claim it.
“I didn’t want to be near other people, and the last thing I wanted was to be in a mystical land hearing someone snoring like a hog!
“I got my east to west sorted, a bit of elevation with outstanding vistas. There was that special huge full moon out and I need to position to see it blazing from what was going to be my no stars bedroom for the night.
“Spot strategically selected, it was then start to make my digs for the night. This actually involved digging and stomping the snow down to make basically a shallow `living’ grave to house me in my sleeping bag.
“With my site almost completed and feeling pretty chuffed, suddenly there was an almighty thundering roar. There was a huge avalanche unfolding right before my eyes, a close enough encounter as a wall of snow came crashing down the mountain. The snow then billowed up like a nuclear explosion for
several minutes. How clever was smarty pants now with her perfect spot?
“After a chat with one of our guides I got the green light to stay put. During the night there were more distant and not-so-distant thunders around the mountain range as the snow and ice surrendered to gravity.”
At 11pm, everyone was told to settle in for the night so they could “hear the magnificent silence”.
Ms Sutherland gazed at the “overwhelming power and beauty”.