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Back in the studio . . . Scott sketches ideas for one of his latest art projects. PHOTO: TYSON YOUNG

While some may not recognise his face, most will recognise his work.

Waimate artist Bill Scott is best known for his work that decorates various buildings around the town, including the massive new silo project at the Transport Waimate yarn in Queen St.

When he is not working in his day job at Headford Propagators, he can be found at work around the house or in his art studio.

Originally a farm boy from the Waihao Downs area, Scott was always interested in art.

“As a child, I was just one of those kids that doodled. I was always drawing something.”

The first job he landed was at a commercial advertising agency in Dunedin. His time there was short-lived, as he disliked working behind a desk.

“I found working inside pretty difficult for me. I’m not an inside person. Life was too interesting. Being a young fellow, I wasn’t too focused on career options.”

After returning from Dunedin, Scott worked in various jobs before moving to Australia for six years. While there he met his future wife, Chris, and dabbled in several fields.

In 1980, the couple came back to Waimate, where he took over his parents’ farm.

“I came back specifically to work on the farm. I thought that would be a good opportunity to raise my young family.”

While working on the farm, he taught himself signwriting and engineering skills.

“Over the years, I’ve just dabbled and played around. I don’t need to be perfect at one thing – I’m probably more interested in being reasonably good at a lot of things.”

Years later, he used the skills to land jobs in the signwriting and engineering industries.

Bill Scott works on the grain silos in Waimate. PHOTO: CRAIG BAXTER

During this time, his talent as an artist became recognised around Waimate and he was asked to paint several murals. They related to Waimate in one way or another, and included works for popular events such as the March Hare Rally and the Waimate 50 motorsport festival.

When he was offered the opportunity to paint murals on the Waimate grain silos, he jumped at it.

“It was an opportunity to do something really, really different.”

The best part about being an artist was having the freedom to express yourself, he said.

“You’ve got to attract the audience with a subject they really like.”

While he did not want to reveal too many details, Scott said there were a few more art projects in the pipeline around Waimate.

He hoped his murals could be admired for years to come.

“If people remember me for the murals, well, I’m proud of that and it’s a nice thing to be remembered for.”