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It's time . . . The youngest pupil, Harry Smith (5), helps to bury the capsules. PHOTO: SUPPLIED

Letters, photographs, artwork, newspapers and predictions for the future were among items buried in time capsules at Waitaki Valley School last week.

On September 19, following a karakia (blessing) and a performance of the school haka, the Kurow school’s oldest and youngest pupils – Harry Smith (5) and Callum Sim (13) – buried time capsules that will be opened in 10 years’ time.

It was the culmination of an “exciting term’s learning” at Waitaki Valley School, principal Matt Bokser said.

“Our inquiry topic this term was called ‘It’s Time!’,” Mr Bokser said.

As part of the inquiry, the pupils have been researching their family history, their present lives – recording information, stories, pictures and memories about themselves and their families – and looking to the future, making predictions about what they think life will be like in 10 years’ time.

“It has been a fantastic project for me too, because coming in as a new principal at the start of the term, I have been able to find out so much about our amazing kids, their families, and the fantastic community up here in the Waitaki Valley,” he said.

Each pupil had the opportunity to fill a self-sealing plastic bag to be included in the time capsules.

“The children all had certain items they had to include, and then they had a choice of other items,” Mr Bokser said.

Included in the time capsules were items such as letters to their future selves, photographs, predictions about the future, their favourite stories, artworks, small mementos and the Oamaru Mail and Otago Daily Timesnewspapers.

The children all thought life was going to be “quite different” in 2029, but their predictions varied.

“Things [such as] there would be flying cars; that technology was going to be very different – especially after looking at the history of items like phones; that there would be no paper – everything would be digital; that there might be no technology – and that practical skills would be important; that global warming would have changed our world.”

Future-focused . . . Waitaki Valley School pupils gather to bury time capsules. PHOTO: SUPPLIED