SADD tactics open eyes

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That is far too many, so we want to decrease that number, help teenagers be safer on the road, remember those who died and remind everyone how important it is to keep safe on the roads.
At Waitaki Boys’ High School, pupils completed a quiz comprising 10 road safety questions, a spot-the-difference cartoon and a competition for a road-safety slogan.
Another activity was making a video that was enjoyable but still sent a serious message. We set out to create this masterpiece, spending afternoons after school filming and preparing the video.
The video showed a group of drunken teenagers deciding to get behind the wheel. This decision came at a cost when the majority were severely hurt or killed in a crash.
The film showed the effect this could have on families and the community. We showed it in our school assembly and received positive feedback.
As well, all the boys in assembly were asked to pull out their phones and send a quick text message. While they were doing this, SADD committee pupils moved to sit in senior management chairs. Once everyone was seated and the boys had finished sending texts, we asked everyone to look up.
The shock on the pupils’ faces showed us how oblivious they were to what had just happened right in front of them. They had missed five seconds of musical chairs, but it could have been somebody’s life gone or severely complicated.
All year 13 pupils have had a session on safe driving delivered by Senior Constable Carrie Hamilton and road safety co-ordinator Elton Crane. It involved watching a DVD about a crash in Milton that involved three vehicles, 12 people, one fatality and various serious injuries. This was followed by a presentation about teenagers’ use of alcohol and marijuana and an opportunity for questions.
For a visual display, we took a “crash car” around the three Oamaru high schools to get students to pledge their support to SADD. All three schools have SADD groups and it is great to have co-operation between them. Safe drivers were able to pledge their support for SADD by signing their names and writing small quotes.
We feel every effort we make to influence people with the principles of SADD is a positive step. It could save lives.