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Billy boy . . . Blues halfback Billy Guyton talks to Waitaki Boys' High School First XV captain Paddy Henwood in the home changing room at Milner Park. PHOTO: HAYDEN MEIKLE

Not every First XV is lucky enough to get a Super rugby player as a waterboy.

That was the case for Waitaki Boys’ High School last week when it had the services of Blues halfback and former North Otago fullback Billy Guyton for the interschool against Southland Boys’ High School.

Guyton’s uncle and near-namesake, Willy Guyton, is the forwards coach for Waitaki Boys’.

Billy Guyton was back in his home town of Waimate for a week, enjoying a chance for some down time during the Super rugby break.

“It’s a longer break than we normally get, so you have to get away when you can,” he told the Oamaru Mail

Guyton grinned when asked if he had hoped to slot in a club rugby game for Waimate during his time off.

“I tried, actually. But they wouldn’t let me do it this time.”

Guyton (27) is in his second year with the Blues after previous spells with the Hurricanes and Crusaders.

He has largely backed up in-form halfback Augustine Pulu, and missed out on the win over the British and Irish Lions, but has enjoyed his time with the Blues.

“It’s a good environment and a good bunch of boys.

“I’ve played seven or eight games. I haven’t had as much game time as I would have liked, but that’s part of professional rugby. People get opportunities and make the most of it.”

For some, the sight of Guyton playing behind the scrum is still odd, given he was almost exclusively a fullback during his time with North Otago.

But the talented all-rounder has played every single backline position in first-class rugby, only settling on halfback when he joined the Tasman union.

“We had a pre-season game against Canterbury and had no halfbacks, so the coach asked me to play there.

“I went all right, and then halfway through the season, the coach put me in at No 9 again. I got the start the next game and just stayed there.

“Super rugby came calling and I was away. Funny things happen.”

Guyton paid tribute to Willy Guyton for the impact his uncle had had on his career.

“He’s been there since I was young, you know. He’s always been a good man to talk to about rugby and he’s helped me do a lot of small things to get better.”